Cae Mariad  -  North Wales  -  View Towards The Mountains  -  MAY 2024

Cae Mariad

Tree Planting in North Wales at Cae Mariad

Cae Mariad is a community led woodland project in Tregarth, near Bangor, North Wales.

IMPORTANT VISITOR INFOTake only photos. Leave only footsteps.

To keep the woodland as natural as possible we don’t label individual trees and we ask that visitors do not place their own plaques, labels, flowers, etc in the woodland. Each tree we plant should be seen as part of a natural woodland.

Before visiting this woodland, please read our Frequently Asked Questions page, which gives you helpful tips about your tree and visitor guidance.

This is a private woodland and can be visited by appointment only. Please email cororionpermaculture@gmail.com to make an appointment.

Cae Mariad is a 3 acre part of Fferm Moelyci (Moelyci farm), west of Tregarth, which once formed part of the medieval township of Cororion.

Nestled in the hills of North West Wales, with views to the Carneddau mountains of Snowdonia, the Menai Straits and Ynys Seiriol (aka “Puffin Island”), Fferm Moelyci has a rich history dating back to the Brythonic era of the Iron Age. It was once part of the medieval township of Cororion, originally “Creu yr Wyrion” (“huts of the grandchildren” according to local historian T. P. Williams), which features in the 12th century tale of Math mab Mathonwy from the Mabinogion:

"So they journeyed on to the highest town of Arllechwedd, and there they made a sty for the swine, and therefore was the name of Creuwyryon given to that town."
(Translation by Lady Charlotte Guest)

From here, the farm's story weaves through centuries of Welsh history. It was part of the medieval land holdings documented in 1352 as “Gafael Goyll”. References to “Moelyci” first appeared in the Penrhyn Manuscripts from 1588 onwards, and the name Moelyci has several possible etymologies, including “Hill of Lleucu” (a girl's name of Welsh origin, meaning “dear light”). In the Victorian era, the farm was reputed to have the largest head of sheep in North Wales.

Today, Moelyci is home to a number of community interest companies, groups and charities, as well as allotments and social enterprises. Many historical features are still visible, and the unimproved grassland areas are grazed by sheep, donkeys and cattle, and are a haven for wildlife. The Cororion Permaculture project, situated at the heart of the farm, is growing trees, vegetables, fruit and herbs to create a “forage garden” to enhance biodiversity and demonstrate nature-friendly regenerative farming practices, with intermittent grazing and wild edges.

THE LOCATION

Moelyci farm is located on the outskirts of Tregarth, a few miles from the cathedral city of Bangor. The farm is traversed by the historic “North Wales Pilgrims Way”, a 135-mile walking trail from Basingwerk Abbey at Holywell to Ynys Enlli (Bardsey Island). For centuries, pilgrims walked this route, across stunning Welsh landscapes dotted with sacred Christian and pre-Christian sites, to reach the tip of the Llŷn Peninsula, and thence by boat to the holy island of Enlli.

The farm is also crossed by the UNESCO designated “Slate Landscape of Northwest Wales” as it lies on the former route of the slate railway that transported slates from the quarries of Bethesda to Penrhyn docks in Bangor. Remnants of this industrial past, such as railway sleepers and the original bridge over the line, are still visible.

Visitors to Moelyci can explore this fascinating heritage on the farm's circular walks. The Lon Las Ogwen cycle path, following the route of the old railway line, offers a scenic route connecting the Ogwen Valley and Bethesda, through the old railway tunnel under Tregarth to Bangor.

CORORION PERMACULTURE

This project, founded by Steve Niner and Richard Edwards, spans a couple of fields and connected areas at the farm. The site comprises moderately species-rich grassland and woodland pasture, with several species of grass and broad-leaved flowers. The main area, Cae Mariad, has a variety of planted and self-seeded trees, and diverse pockets of habitat. Bird's-foot trefoil is abundant in places and the scrub (brambles, willows and birches) supports breeding pairs of warblers (whitethroat, willow warbler, blackcap and chiff-chaff) and other songbirds, as well as other visitors.

In the spirit of the site's ancient past, and applying permaculture and syntropic agroforestry principles, they are establishing:

- A forest garden with areas for camping, contemplation and nature connection
- An orchard preserving heritage apple varieties
- Regenerative grazing to improve soil and pasture health
- Wildlife habitat with native trees, hedgerow, and wildflowers

Through diverse planting and regenerative practices, they are creating a productive and biodiverse landscape that honours Moelyci's ancestry while establishing a semi-wild woodland pasture emphasising species useful to wildlife, humans and others and which they hope will support generations yet to come.

While the fields do not include a legal right of way, a permissive path was incorporated into the design when the fruit trees were planted, and the fields continue to be visited by members of the public.

The new trees will help improve the biodiversity of the area as well as providing a food source and shelter for wildlife.

Fferm Moelyci welcomes visitors, so please stop by the excellent on-site cafe and shop, enjoy the walking trails, and come for a guided tour of the Cororion Permaculture project.

To arrange a visit, or get involved, please cororionpermaculture@gmail.com email them with your contact details.

Photo Gallery

  • Cae Mariad  -  North Wales  -  View Towards The Mountains  -  MAY 2024
  • Cae Mariad  -  North Wales  -  View Towards The Mountains  -  AUTUMN 2023
  • Cae Mariad  -  North Wales
  • Cae Mariad - North Wales - Inspecting The New Trees' Progress With Steve Niner - MAY 2024
  • Cae Mariad  -  North Wales  -  Dogwood Tree Sapling On Field Margin  -  MAY 2024.JPG
  • Cae Mariad  -  North Wales  -  Gorse Trees On Field Margin  -  MAY 2024.JPG
  • Cae Mariad  -  North Wales  -  Hazel And Field Maple Tree Saplings On Field Margin  -  MAY 2024
  • Cae Mariad  -  North Wales  -  Hazel Tree On Field Margin  -  MAY 2024.JPG
  • Cae Mariad  -  North Wales  -  Hazel Tree Saplings Are Planted Throughout The Field  -  MAY 2024
  • Cae Mariad  -  North Wales  -  Hazel Tree Saplings Border The Path Around The Field  -  MAY 2024
  • Cae Mariad  -  North Wales  -  Hornbeam Tree Sapling Thriving Among The Nettles  -  MAY 2024
  • Cae Mariad  -  North Wales  -  Juniper Tree Sapling Growing Among The Tall Grass  -  MAY 2024
  • Cae Mariad  -  North Wales  -  Red Oak Tree Sapling Thriving Among The Nettles  -  MAY 2024
  • Cae Mariad  -  North Wales  -  Red Oak Tree Sapling Thriving Among The Tall Grass  -  MAY 2024
  • Cae Mariad  -  North Wales  -  Rowan Tree On Field Margin  -  MAY 2024.JPG
  • Cae Mariad  -  North Wales  -  Scots Pine Tree Sapling On Field Margin  -  MAY 2024
  • Cae Mariad  -  North Wales  -  Scots Pine Tree Sapling Thriving With New Shoots  -  MAY 2024
  • Cae Mariad  -  North Wales  -  Scots Pine Tree Saplings Thriving Among The Tall Grass  -  MAY 2024
  • Cae Mariad  -  North Wales  -  Sweet Chestnut Tree On Field Margin  -  MAY 2024
  • Cae Mariad - North Wales - Sweet Chestnut, Oak And Other Tree Saplings On The Field Margin - MAY 2024
  • Cae Mariad - North Wales - Sycamore Tree Sapling On The Field's Border - MAY 2024
  • Cae Mariad  -  North Wales  -  The Meadow With Wild Flowers And Mature Trees  -  MAY 2024
  • Cae Mariad  -  North Wales  -  Tree Saplings Are Marked With Bamboo Canes Around The Field  -  MAY 2024
  • Cae Mariad  -  North Wales  -  Walnut Tree Sapling On Field Margin  -  MAY 2024
  • Cae Mariad  -  North Wales  -  Wild Cherry Tree On Field Margin  -  MAY 2024.JPG
  • Cae Mariad  -  North Wales  -  Wild Cherry Tree Sapling Thriving Among The Nettles  -  MAY 2024
  • Cae Mariad  -  North Wales  -  Willow Tree Saplings Thrive In The Wet Field Margins  -  MAY 2024
  • Cae Mariad  -  North Wales  -  A Small Yew Tree Sapling Growing Among The Tall Grass  -  MAY 2024
  • Cae Mariad  -  North Wales  -  Broom Tree On Field Margin  -  MAY 2024.JPG

Tree Species at Cae Mariad

Since 2023 EFORESTS has worked with the land owners and local volunteers to plant 500 native species trees.

The following tree species were planted on the site:

IMPORTANT VISITOR INFOTake only photos. Leave only footsteps.

To keep the woodland as natural as possible we don’t label individual trees and we ask that visitors do not place their own plaques, labels, flowers, etc in the woodland. Each tree we plant should be seen as part of a natural woodland.

Before visiting this woodland, please read our Frequently Asked Questions page, which gives you helpful tips about your tree and visitor guidance.

Dedicate a tree to be planted in North Wales or elsewhere in the UK.